kateoplis:

It was an unlikely crime scene: a steep trail used by bears leading to a still, ancient redwood grove. There, a rare old-growth coast redwood had been brutally hacked about 15 times by poachers, a chain saw massacre that had exposed the tree’s deep red heartwood.

The thieves who butchered this and other 1,000-year-old arboreal giants were after the burls, gnarly protrusions on the trees that are prized for their intricately patterned wood. Although timber theft has long plagued public lands, a recent spate of burl poaching, with 18 known cases in the last year, has forced park officials to close an eight-mile drive through old-growth forests, the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, at night to deter criminals. More closings are expected.

While some burls are small and barnacle-like — perfect for souvenir salt-and-pepper shakers — others weigh hundreds of pounds and can fetch hundreds or thousands of dollars per slab.

The poachers, known locally as the “midnight burlers,” are motivated by a sluggish local economy and expensive methamphetamine habits, park officials say, and they have been targeting ever-bigger burls and using increasingly brazen tactics. Last year, a redwood estimated to be 400 years old was felled by thieves who wanted access to a 500-pound burl 60 feet up. It was the first time an entire tree was cut down for a burl…

Old-growth coast redwoods are among the earth’s most tenacious organisms, some living 2,000 years or more. Removing a burl cuts into a tree’s living cambium layer, which can weaken it and make it vulnerable to insects and disease.

Poachers Attack Beloved Elders of California, Its Redwoods

THIS HORRIFIES ME!

(via agoodturndaily)

fyeahwomenartists:

Geta Brătescu
The Traveler (1970)
Folding Wooden Chair / Paper Print

fyeahwomenartists:

Geta Brătescu

The Traveler (1970)

Folding Wooden Chair / Paper Print

digbicks:

Human Error, Victoria Siemer

Brooklyn-based graphic designer Victoria Siemer, also known as Witchoria, has an ongoing photography series updated weekly called Human Error in which the artist digitally overlays an existential or lovelorn computerized error message over a scanned Polaroid. The error message prompts the viewer for an action or to wait, illustrating the futility of this technological exercise when perceived in the context of heartbreak or ennui.

(Source: behance.net, via bavarde)

claireolivergallery:

Judith Schaechter sent us images of this work in progress from her studio.  She explains that “in order to make a red figure, one must engrave blue glass.”

Schaechter will have a new exhibition at the gallery in September. Stay tuned for more updates from her!

sea-weaver:

Slowly coming together. #weaving

This is beautiful

sea-weaver:

Slowly coming together. #weaving

This is beautiful

Search
Navigate
Archive

Text, photographs, quotes, links, conversations, audio and visual material preserved for future reference.